Homework Hints 6-4

[tippy title=”Problems 1-2″]Problems 1-2
Being able to adequately answer both of these questions is essential to being able to solve equations. Look at the essential ideas for the answers.[/tippy]

[tippy title=”Problems 3a and 3b”]Problems 3a and 3b: Ask yourself what is being subtracted from x? Then add that number to both sides, as shown in Example 1.[/tippy]

[tippy title=”Problems 3c and 3d”]Problems 3c and 3d: Ask yourself what is being added to x? Then, the opposite is to subtract that number from both sides.[/tippy]

[tippy title=”Problems 4a and 4b”]Problems 4a and 4b: Ask yourself what is being divided into x? Then multiply both sides by that number, as shown in Example 1.[/tippy]

[tippy title=”Problems 4c and 4d”]Problems 4c and 4d: Ask yourself what is x being multiplied by? Then, the opposite is to divide both sides by that number.[/tippy]

[tippy title=”Problems 5a and 5b”]Problems 5a and 5b: Ask yourself what is x being multiplied by? Then, the opposite is to divide both sides by that number.[/tippy]

[tippy title=”Problem 5c”]Problem 5c: Ask yourself what is x being multiplied by? Then, the opposite is to divide both sides by that number.[/tippy]

[tippy title=”Problem 5d”]Problems 5d: What do you need to do to both sides? (see Example 1.)[/tippy]

[tippy title=”Problems 6-9″]Problems 6-9
Let x be the repeating decimal, and determine the number of digits that repeat. If it is one, multiply both sides by 10; if two digits repeat, multiply both sides by 100; if three digits repeat, multiply both sides by 1,000; and so on. Then subtract the original equation from both sides as shown in Example 3.[/tippy]

[tippy title=”Problems 10-13″]Problems 10-13
Look at the equations, first multiply the variable by a number, then add or subtract. To reverse these steps, first add or subtract, and then divide to reverse the multiplication. See Example 2d.[/tippy]

[tippy title=”Problem 14″]Problem 14
You can multiply first (using the distributive property), as shown in Example 2e, or you can divide first. That is, in part a, divide both sides by 4 and in part b divide both sides by 5.[/tippy]

[tippy title=”Problems 15-16″]Problems 15-16
What do you need to do to both sides? (see Example 1.) There are two thinks to do in Problem 13b: first multiply both sides by 3 and then divide both sides by 2.[/tippy]

[tippy title=”Problems 17-25″]Problems 17-25
These problems require more than one operation, as shown in Example 2. First, make sure that the expression on the left side of the equal sign is simplified, and then make sure the expression on the right side of the equal sign is simplified.
Remember the simplified order of operations is first multiply/divide and then add/subtract.  To reverse this process (which is what we are doing when solving an equation), generally, you should add/sub the same number to both sides and then multiply/divide both sides by the same (nonzero) number.[/tippy]

[tippy title=”Problem 26″]Problem 26
Use the answers for Problems 10 to 25 to fill in the puzzle. For example, from Problem 10a, you know A = 5, so find any blanks in the puzzle which show the number 5 (there is only one); fill in the letter “A”. (Yes, this means you need to work all of the problems.) If you have done these problems correctly, and if you have filled in the puzzle correctly, you will be able to read the secret message.[/tippy]

[tippy title=”Problems 27-48″]Problems 27-48
First, get a zero on one side.
Next, factor (if possible).
If it factors, use the zero-product rule (as shown in Example 4).
If it does not factor, use the quadratic formula (as shown in Example 5).[/tippy]

[tippy title=”Problems 49-54″]Problems 49-54
See Example 6 and the calculator comment.[/tippy]

Note: Homework Hints are given only for the Level 1 and Level 2 problems.

However, as you go through the book be sure you look at all the examples in the text. If you need hints for the Level 3 problems, check some sources for help on the internet (see the LINKS for that particular section. As a last resort, you can call the author at (707) 829-0606.

On the other hand, the problems designated “Problem Solving” generally require techniques that do not have textbook examples.

There are many sources for homework help on the internet.

Algebra.help
Here is a site where technology meets mathematics. You can search a particular topic or choose lessons, calculators, worksheets for extra practice or other resources.
http://www.algebrahelp.com/

Ask Dr. Math
Dr. Math is a registered trademark. This is an excellent site at which you can search to see if your question has been previously asked, or you can send your question directly to Dr. Math to receive an answer.
http://mathforum.org/dr.math/

Quick Math
This site provides online graphing calculators. This is especially useful if you do not have your own calculator.
http://www.quickmath.com/

The Math Forum @ Drexel
This site provides an internet mathematics library that can help if you need extra help. For additional homework help at this site, click one of the links in the right-hand column.
http://mathforum.org/